Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Book Launch Celebrates Women Who Care

Women Who Care, a collection of women’s stories about health care and caring, is being launched at the Women’s Health Resources, Foothills Medical Centre, Room 160 on Thursday, November 25 from 1:00 pm to 2:30 p.m.


Patricia Thille, one of the editors of the book, is currently a PhD student at the University of Calgary. She will read excerpts and talking about the experiences of “women who care.” Copies of the book will be available for $19.95 and are also available through Shelf Life Books.


Through these moving, funny, and sometimes poignant poems and stories, women from across Canada share their personal and professional experiences as caregivers in various stages of their lives and careers. The women discuss personal health and illness, seeking care from others, and being lay caregivers to their children, partners, aging parents and extended family. Some work as health care professionals, other work in community centres and shelters, as activists in women’s health or as health policy-makers.


This event is presented through the Women's Health Knowledge Centre (WHKC) which works closely with the Women's Health Resources to serve women of all ages, educational backgrounds & socioeconomic levels. Women's Health Resources is a program under the Women's Health Outpatient Programs at the Foothills Medical Centre. Services provided include professional health & well-being information, and support for women, such as counseling and, health & wellness workshops. Patients and workshop attendees can obtain health information and borrow materials from the WHKC.


Contact: Donna Livingstone, Director of Communications for Libraries & Cultural Resources at the University of Calgary by email for more details

Friday, November 12, 2010

Overdrive

David Luinstra

For months I’ve been toying with the idea of taking the plunge and getting into the wonderful world of e-readers. I was intrigued by the idea of being able to carry around hundreds of books with me in my back pocket, being able to easily skip from chapter to chapter, and having less clutter (with apologies to any bibliophile I’ve offended by calling books clutter) in my house. The counterweight to all of these pros was a big con: the price. After all, why pay for a device when you can get books for free at your local Calgary Public Library branch?
 
Thankfully, this stalemate was broken when I won a Kobo at a staff function. I took it out of the box the very same night and after about 5 minutes of use, I was hooked. But unless I resigned myself to reading nothing but the 100 free classics that come with the device (according to Kobo, I’m now approximately 1% through War and Peace), I needed a convenient, reliable, and, most importantly, free source of books.
 
Although I knew about CPL’s Overdrive service, and have been actively promoting it to customers, I hadn’t used it to download content until now. I was pleased with how quickly and easily I could acquire material, and the lazy man in me loved the idea of instantly downloading books from my living room, in my pyjamas. Similar to traditional library service, CPL lends digital books for three week time periods, but unlike physical collections, they are automatically returned after the loan period is up. I was impressed with the selection of books, and with more and more people using e-readers, the amount of available titles will surely increase.
As a new convert to e-reading, I encourage anybody who has been contemplating “going digital” to give it a try, and once you’ve made the switch, check out Calgary Public Library’s Overdrive ebook and audio book service.

Friday, November 5, 2010

One Book One Calgary at Calgary Public Library!


For the inaugural One Book, One Calgary Calgary Public Library has chosen Mavericks: An Incorrigible History of Alberta as the book that all Calgarians should read in the month of November 2010. 

Working with civic partners, leadership organizations, artists and entertainers, One Book One Calgary represents the most ambitious program initiative ever undertaken at Calgary Public Library. Libraries will host made in Calgary talent and Maverick Celebrations across the city. Our opening event in the John Dutton Theatre will be the place to be on Thursday November 4 with Mavericks Live from 7:00 – 8:00PM and Mavericks Unplugged from 8:00 – 9:30PM, two shows with great performers such as the Heebee-jeebees, Sheri-D Wilson, Kris Demeanor and Matt Masters. Aritha van Herk and Will Ferguson will add the literary touch.

Kick start a month of One Book One Calgary events with author Aritha van Herk, and community friends during our Heritage Weekend. Capture the life and times of our maverick city and people who helped to shape it with two days of activities that are designed to uncover the forces that shaped our city’s distinct identity.

Our Heart of the City series looks at the importance of Calgary’s volunteer and charitable sectors. The generous spirit of Calgarians, social entrepreneurship, philanthropy and our reputation as a city that cares will be up for discussion.

Be inspired with Maverick Leadership and Cowtown Creativity when community leaders discuss our city’s creative potential, innovative character and economic prosperity.

Join important community discussions through Exploring our Past, Examining our Present, and Imagining our Future, online or in person with One Book One Calgary author Aritha van Herk who will lead, provoke and question our city’s values. And check out the website at http://calgarypubliclibrary.com/onebookonecalgary for information on the many programs, panel discussion, and dramatic readings at your local branch, and even the first chapter of Mavericks: An Incorrigible History of Alberta. 

These programs will spark your thoughts and challenge us all to define the city we hope to create for future generations. 

Ignite your passion, opinions, and civic pride at Calgary Public Library this November for One Book One Calgary.

“The idea is that the city that opens the same book closes it in greater harmony.” 
- Mary McGrory, The Washington Post